Door Knocking

Last weekend, a good friend of mine and I went down to Juliaetta and knocked on roughly eighty doors in Juliaetta, ID. I have been to their elementary school, and navigated the maze of sidewalks and lights to attend their city council meeting. I also celebrated my birthday down there last Spring at Colters Creek Winery. This was my first real dip into their neighborhoods, however. My job as an early intervention physical therapist takes me into all the small towns in Latah County, but about ten years ago, our region decided that Juliaetta and Kendrick should be served out of the Lewiston office. It was a more efficient use of resources, and Latah County picked up Plummer from the region to the north. Juliaetta has hills. Steep ones. It also has not yet benefited from the county’s push to get blue address signs marking each home or driveway. Houses were hard to find. I resorted to knocking on doors, and then asking the people inside what their address was.

When I started this campaign, I dreaded door knocking. As a kid, I was required to sell Girl Scout cookies. In those days, you could not set up a booth at the grocery store, nor could you camp out next to the pot shop in WA. You went door to door. Parents did not go with, or at least my mom who was a Brownie leader, refused to. She believed scouts should earn their badges without parental assistance. I flunked this badge miserably. I was painfully shy as a kid, and shorter than most folks’ windows in their storm doors. I knocked softly, prayed they weren’t home. Half the time, if they answered, they could not see me, so would quickly close the door. I never spoke up. I sold no cookies. The next year I decided to give up scouts and became a springboard diver which took all my free time. Being shy and quiet was not an impediment, it made me more coachable. I was a good listener.

Surprisingly, door knocking has been my favorite part of running for county commissioner. I still get a little nervous at each door, sometimes it is a relief to just write a note on and leave my card in the door frame. But, I have had more real conversations on door steps than in any other part of this campaign. Forums and meet and greets are great for speaking to a larger audience, but they are very prescribed. Two minutes for introductions, two minutes or less for questions that in no way can be answered in any depth in the allotted time. A minute to try to hammer in any closing thoughts. Parades and yard signs increase visibility and name recognition, but there is no chance to talk with folks. I like door knocking because I get to have real conversations with real people. Partisan identity rarely comes up, on either my side or theirs. I can answer a question in depth if asked, but mostly I just listen. I hear what matters to them, what their dreams are, and what is frustrating. I listen, and I learn, and what I have learned will shape my future role as a county commissioner.

We are just over a week from the election. I am down to less than twenty five of my original thousands of palm cards. I had over four hundred yard signs, and those are gone, too. I have nothing left to offer at the doors that I do knock. I do have time though. And I do have an ear. I will not be in a hurry, and I will listen to you.